LA MER

Next week we will walk along the beach
and periodically stare out on the ocean.
The waves will wash in and out, and one
will look much like the last and the next.
If we get out early enough, perhaps we will
sit outside a café across the road from the beach
and drink our wet cappuccinos and eat our bagels
while watching some 20-something
perform yoga poses on the sand, poses that we
can remember, uncertain how our bodies
ever assumed those postures, certain
to do so again would cause breakage
that would put medicine to an unfair test.
We watch the elderly drivers, question
why they still have licenses to drive, and
to the extent possible, avoid looking in mirrors.

FROM THE BEGINNING

Pangu* came by for a visit the other night. He tends to drop by uninvited.
“Hate to call ahead,” he says, “it ruins the surprise.” He’s aged a bit
since the last visit, and I told him he looked different.

“It’s just a look. It’s the same old me, but I tend to scare people. So I’m
traveling under the name of Adam now,” and showed me a drivers license
to confirm it.

I asked what he was doing for a last name, how he got the license without one.

“They tried to force it,” he said, “but when I told them you get that from your
father, and I had none, they let it go.” He headed for the door.

I told him to take care of himself because we both knew that when he dies, a new
universe will be born and it’s crowded enough around here already.


* Pangu  is the first living being and the creator of all in Chinese mythology.